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Published: 19:17 BST, 14 December 2015 | Updated: 07:38 BST, 16 December 2015

Shoppers were today advised against buying expensive painkillers after it emerged big brands such as Nurofen charge a huge mark-up for the same drug.

While the same drug - ibuprofen - can cost as little as 20p a packet when sold as an own brand, the cost can be at least 10 times this when sold under a popular brand name. 

Nurofen has also come under fire in the last 24 hours for charging almost double for its specialist pain relief products - which contain the same ingredients as its standard painkiller. 

Critics say drugs firm Reckitt Benckiser charges more for interchangeable products, despite the medications containing identical dose of ibupfrofen.

Its Nurofen Express Period Pain typically costs £3.79 despite it containing no more pain relief than its £2 packets of standard painkiller.

The targeted range each contain 342mg of fast-acting ibuprofen lysine - which is equivalent to 200mg ordinary ibuprofen found in its standard tablets - but is said to work faster.

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Many painkilling medicines have exactly the same active ingredients, despite vastly different marketing, packaging and pricing. Research has found that market-leading painkiller Nurofen costs on average £2.01 per pack of 16 tablets. But generic alternatives at Asda and Tesco can be bought for as little as 30p - a difference of 567 per cent

Research has shown that shoppers are spending a staggering £2.5 billion a year on expensive branded pills and lotions when cheaper, generic versions are just as effective.

One of the biggest money-spinners is Britain’s £350 million market in ‘targeted’ painkillers, which claim to treat specific areas of the body, such as the Nurofen brand.

Today, Richard Headland, editor of the consumer watchdog Which?, said:  'Our research shows many painkilling medicines have exactly the same active ingredients, despite vastly different marketing, packaging and pricing.

'Our advice to people is to buy cheaper generic medicines wherever possible and, if in doubt, ask a pharmacist.  

Reckitt Benckiser said today the price hike was down to the products being formulated differently, with some designed for slow release while others, like headache tablets, are designed to have a more immediate hit. 

'If Nurofen's products have the same active ingredients, the same format and the same formulation, they have the same manufacturer's recommended retail price (MRRP),' it said.

'Nurofen pain-specific products are not the same as standard Nurofen. They are available in different formats and faster acting formulations.'

It follows the ruling by an Australian court to remove certain products from shelves after claims they misled customers because the product contents were identical, despite being marketed to target different types of pain.

Nurofen came under fire today for charging almost double for specialist pain relief products - which contain the same ingredients as its standard painkiller. Pictured are the prices for Nurofen Express Period Pain, £3.79, (16 soft caps) Nurofen Tension Headache, £2.85, (12 caplets) Nurofen, £2.00 (16 caplets), Nurofen Back Pain (24 caplets) and Nurofen Migraine Pain, £2.85, (12 caplets)

The UK's Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) confirmed it is investigating 12 complaints about a television advert for Nurofen Express which implies the tablets specifically target pains in the head

The products are still being sold in the UK because of the additional information printed on the back of packets which states it can be taken for different illnesses.  

However, the UK's advertising watchdog is investigating 12 complaints in the UK about a television advert for Nurofen Express. 

THE BRANDED PRODUCTS THAT COST TEN TIMES THE PRICE  

The scandal cones after research earlier this year revealed that millions of shoppers are still paying nearly ten times more for branded medicines that are identical to shop's own versions, a study has found.

The cost of branded over-the-counter painkillers at high street supermarkets and chemists can be up to 725 per cent more expensive than their no-frills versions.

And the products, which in some cases contain exactly the same ingredients as their cheaper alternatives, claim to do the same job.

The research found that market-leading painkiller Nurofen costs on average £2.01 per pack of 16 tablets.

But generic alternatives at Asda and Tesco can be bought for as little as 30p - a difference of 567 per cent.

Both products contain exactly 200mg of ibuprofen and claim to offer the same pain relief.  

The price comparison study was carried out by Voucherbox.co.uk. 

Branded products sometimes claims to target specific areas of the body, or specific ailments such as period pain, headaches or muscular problems.

For example, Nurofen and Feminax both market forms of ibuprofen that are aimed specifically at those suffering from period pain, while Panadol ActiFast, which is a branded form of paracetamol, claims on the packet to treat tension headaches, period pains and toothache.

But as part of a BBC investigation aired in April, Dr Chris Van Tulleken, an infectious an infectious diseases specialist, says that once the medicine is absorbed into the bloodstream, there is no way to send it to a particular part of the body.

He also revealed that different branded packets all have an identical product licence number, which means they look different but contain exactly the same pills.

'It isn't that the manufacturers are being untruthful, but it is clever marketing to tempt you to spend more money,' Dr Van Tulleken said in the documentary.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is examining whether the advert was misleading because it implies the product directly targets muscles in the head.

It is also looking into whether viewers were misled by the claim that the Nurofen Express 'gives you faster headache relief than standard paracetamol or ibuprofen'.

An ASA spokesman said: 'We received the complaints in February and launched an investigation in March. This is a complex case and our investigation is ongoing.

'The advertiser is providing evidence to substantiate its claims, we're carefully assessing that and we'll publish our findings in due course.'

The Australian court ordered the tablets to be taken off the shelves after finding the products marketed to treat specific pains, such as migraine and period pains, were identical to one another - and therefore misled consumers.  

It said that British-based multinational had made misleading claims about its Nurofen Back Pain, Nurofen Period Pain, Nurofen Migraine Pain and Nurofen Tension Headache products.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) took the company to court in March.

Each product contains 342mg of fast-acting ibuprofen lysine, which is equivalent to 200mg ordinary ibuprofen. It found each product had the same effect on pain.

It comes just months after a study found the market-leading painkiller Nurofen costs on average £2.01 per pack of 16 tablets.

But generic alternatives at Asda and Tesco can be bought for as little as 30p - a difference of 567 per cent.

Both products contain exactly 200mg of ibuprofen and claim to offer the same pain relief. 

Nurofen argues the products had been 'designed to help the consumer easily navigate our range', especially in stores where there was no pharmacy.  

Manufacturer Reckitt Benckiser, which is based in Slough and also makes Durex condoms, Finish dish-washing tablets, and Cillit Bang household cleaners, denied it had set out to mislead customers. 

Aomesh Bhatt, head of regulatory and medical affairs for Reckitt Benckiser in Europe, that it was an 'Australia-only issue' with no implications for UK sales. 

Research showed packs targeted at specific types of pain helped 61 per cent of customers find the right type of products, he said. 

'The Nurofen specific-pain range was launched with an intention to help consumers navigate their pain relief options, particularly in grocers where there is no healthcare professional to assist,' he said. 

The ACCC launched an investigation which found the targeted relief tablets comparable to general pain relief varieties available, in some cases, for half the price

The firm said it would replace Australian products with new packaging that clearly states the drugs are equally effective at treating other forms of pain.  

The Proprietary Association of Great Britain, (PAGB) the UK trade association representing manufacturers of branded over-the-counter medicines and food supplements. 

HOW MUCH IS NUROFEN IN THE UK? 

Nurofen (16 200mg tablets): £2 (12.5p per tablet)

Nurofen Tension Headache: (12 342mg tablets): £2.85 (23.75p per tablet)

Nurofen Migraine Pain (12 342mg caplets): £2.85 (23.75p per tablet)

Nurofen Express Period Pain (16 liquid capsules): £3.79 (23.6p per tablet)

Nurofen Back Pain (24 300mg capsules): £6.49 (27p per tablet)

Boots Ibuprofen tablets (16 200mg tablets): 35 pence (2p per tablet)

Source: Boots website 

John Smith, PAGB Chief Executive, said: 'In the UK, some pain relief products are marketed for specific pain symptoms. This is because research shows that having specific symptoms clearly displayed on the front of the pack helps people to search the shelf and choose a suitable product more easily.

'While some products contain the same active ingredient, they may be formulated in a way that makes the product better suited for a particular sort of pain. 

'For example, headache sufferers might want to choose a medicine which is faster acting, as speed of treatment is particularly relevant for this condition. Back pain tends to be longer lasting and therefore best suited to a product which is designed to slowly release the active ingredient.

'Product manufacturers work with MHRA, the UK's medicines' regulator, to ensure that all over-the-counter medicines are safe, effective and have appropriate packaging. Products can only be put on the market once they have been approved by MHRA.' 

The Federal Court in Australia ruled that Reckitt deceived Australians by selling Nurofen painkillers that were marketed to relieve specific ailments when all of the products contained an identical amount of the same active ingredient, ibuprofen lysine. 

The retail price of the targeted relief tablets was much higher than other comparable tablets which were marketed as general pain relievers. 

In the UK, Nurofen Migraine Pain and Nurofen Tension Headache are available in caplets, as well as Nurofen Express Period Pain in soft capsules. 

In the UK, according to the Boots website, Nurofen is £2 for a packet of 16 200mg packets, compared to £2.85 for a packet of Nurofen Tension Headache and Nurofen Migraine Pain. 

In Australia, Justice James Edelman wrote in his judgement: 'None of the four products is any more or less effective than the others in treating any of the particular symptoms.' 

During proceedings, the firm admitted that it had engaged in the contravening conduct.

Many painkilling medicines have exactly the same active ingredients, despite vastly different marketing, packaging and pricing

Which? 

The company has been ordered to remove the products from the shelves within three months, and to publish corrective notices to inform consumers of the findings.

The ACCC has agreed an interim packaging arrangement with Reckitt Benckiser for use following the removal of these products. 

This will clearly disclose to consumers that the products are equally effective for other forms of pain.

A hearing is yet to be set by the court to discuss a penalty amount for the company.  

A spokesperson for the Medicines & Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said if it received a complaint that UK advertising was misleading, it would investigate.

They added: 'MHRA is responsible for ensuring the quality, safety, and efficacy of medicines including over-the-counter painkillers. 

'For over-the-counter medicines informative names are permitted to help patients select an appropriate product without input from a healthcare professional.' 

SO WHAT ARE TARGETED PAINKILLERS AND DO THEY WORK? 

Consumer watchdog Which? investigates targeted painkillers. 

Targeted painkillers? You might think that Nurofen Migraine Pain and Nurofen Tension Headache caplets would target your migraine and tension headaches respectively, but you'd be wrong: ibuprofen can't target pain in specific body parts.

The products (Nurofen Migraine Pain and Tension Headache) are actually exactly the same as each other and – available until recently – Nurofen Express caplets (342mg of fast-acting ibuprofen lysine). 

Nurofen Migraine Pain is the same product as Nurofen tension headaches

The latter has now been superseded by Nurofen Express 256mg sodium ibuprofen, prada but all three still contain a 200mg dose of the active ingredient ibuprofen, plus a type of salt to speed up absorption.

One of our experts said: 'It's a waste of money to buy so-called targeted painkillers, and potentially dangerous as you might be misled into taking a double dose, thinking that they're different medicines.'

Of course, most leading pharmacies and supermarkets also sell generic versions of fast-acting ibuprofen, at as little as a third of the cost per tablet of Nurofen. They're not identical to the Nurofen tablets – even though the active ingredients are the same (342mg ibuprofen lysine) – but they're often identical to each other once you look past the brand, packaging claims and prices.

We found 14 products, some shown below, that are all identical to each other, ranging from 8p a tablet at Wilko to 20p per tablet at Boots and Superdrug. They are variously sold as 'migraine relief', 'period pain relief', 'express pain relief' and 'rapid pain relief, but are actually made at the same production site (labs) to exactly the same formulation.

If you examine the fine print, you'll find all these products carry the same marketing authorisation (product licence/PL) number. This means they are the same, but the licence allows it to be sold under different names.

You can ignore targeted marketing if you're clear you're taking the right ingredient and dose: a man taking Feminax Express – marketed for period pain – will simply be getting 342mg of ibuprofen lysine. 

Source: Which? 

 


Источник: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3359775/Nurofen-tablets-taken-shelves-Australia-misleading-customers-sold-UK.html

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Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards

Michelle dockery parties in a printed prada dress before the sag awards